Why is Guelph called the ‘Royal City’?

"Plan of the Town of Guelf, Upper Canada, Founded by the Canada Company 1827," engraved by J. and C. Walker and reduced by F. Caltlin in Joseph Bouchette, The British Dominions in North America (London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1831) (facing 1:118).

“Plan of the Town of Guelf, Upper Canada, Founded by the Canada Company 1827,” engraved by J. and C. Walker and reduced by F. Caltlin in Joseph Bouchette, The British Dominions in North America (London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1831) (facing 1:118).

 

The city of Guelph was named by founder John Galt in 1827 to honour the British Royal Family, the Hanoverians, who were descended from the House of Welf (Also known as the Guelfs or Guelph), one of the great political factions in late medieval Germany and Italy, and the ancestral family of the reigning British monarch at the time George IV.

The origin of the city’s name is also why you might hear Guelph referred to as “The Royal City.” The spelling has been changed to today’s “Guelph” — but it’s pronounced just as it was over 170 years ago: gwelf (rhymes with self).

Did you know?

Learn more about the rich history of Guelph at Guelph Civic Museum and Guelph Public Library.

Circa 1960 photo of the Founding Site in Guelph. At the corner of Macdonell and Surrey St. (now Wellington St.) is the plaque marking the site where John Galt fell the first tree, founding Guelph, The plaque is on the side of the stone wall supporting the CNR overpass. Copyright: Guelph Civic Museum

Circa 1960 photo of the Founding Site in Guelph. At the corner of Macdonell and Surrey St. (now Wellington St.) is the plaque marking the site where John Galt fell the first tree, founding Guelph, The plaque is on the side of the stone wall supporting the CNR overpass. Copyright: Guelph Civic Museum

 

Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/vintageguelph

Like us on Facebook

Related Links:

About Guelph

Guelph: A People’s Heritage 1827 – 2002 (PDF)

History of Guelph: 1827 – 1927

The Royal City’s long royal connections

 

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Leave a Reply